Kristine Gloria

Kristine Gloria

Director, Artificial Intelligence, Aspen Digital

Kristine Gloria joined the Aspen Institute as a Project Manager in September 2016. Currently, she serves as the Director of Artificial Intelligence for the Aspen Digital program in Washington, D.C. The initiative aims to challenge, provoke, and advance the evolution of future technologies (e.g. artificial intelligence, 5G, quantum, etc.) with meaning and dignity for humans. This includes the impact of these technologies on individual health and well-being as well as our social connections.  To accomplish this, the initiative focuses on improving the design, development, and governance of emerging technology systems through research, dialogue, education, and public policymaking.

Prior to joining Aspen, Kristine served as a visiting researcher for the Internet Policy Research Initiative (IPRI) at MIT-CSAIL in Cambridge, MA. There she conducted research on methodologies employed by members of the human-computer interaction and usability communities in designing privacy preserving technologies. Kristine also held a position as a Privacy Research Fellow with the Startup Policy Lab (SPL) and a fellowship with the Center for Society, Technology and Policy (CSTP) at UC-Berkeley. Her work focused on privacy-by-design and municipal drone policymaking with the city of San Francisco.

Outside of academia, Kristine has held a variety of positions both in public and private industry. From 2010-2012, Kristine served as the Deputy Legislative Director for TX-Representative Eddie Lucio III in Brownsville, Texas. There she specialized in environmental and education policy initiatives. Prior to joining the Representative’s office, Kristine worked at the New America Foundation in the Media Policy Initiative where she focused on copyright and censorship issues on the Internet. She began her professional career in public relations representing Fortune 500 tech companies, like AMD & Microsoft, as an associate with Waggener Edstrom Worldwide.

Kristine holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her dissertation, “Imprudence of Reason: An Examination of Privacy Expectations” explored expertise and non-expertise practices of information sharing online, commenting on potential implications for both privacy policies and future technology design. She also holds a Bachelor’s in Journalism and a M.A. in Media Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. She is an avid runner and has two precocious toddlers who love Star Trek Enterprise.

Authored by Kristine