Communications

Morris Series: Creative Tensions: The Re-design of Dialogue

Event information
Date
Wed May 22, 2019
6:00pm - 7:30pm
Location
Walt Disney Family Museum
San Francisco, CA
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The right conversation can change a life; the right conversation can change the course of history.

Dialogue happens all the time, good dialogue less so. If you are not approaching dialogue with creativity and control you then become a victim to it. This is true at mass scale or one on one. Fred Dust, partner at creative consultancy IDEO, will highlight, and question, our long history of invention and design of dialogue. Did debate replace the duel? What can be learned from the Passover Seder? Did psychology destroy or enable the act of listening?  Can a board game establish new rules for conversation? What can protest learn from pilgrimage? This talk is meant to rekindle the creative courage to design dialogue in all new ways and give us tools we can apply to the boardroom or the town square.

Dust will highlight our shared history in dialogue and remind us that we know how to do this—we’ve just forgotten from lack of practice. We have reasons for optimism as we’ve evolved as humans we have also continually evolved new ways to have difficult dialogues as such, there is rich history to pull from.  Dialogue is, after all, the fundamental human tool.

Fred Dust is a senior partner at international design firm IDEO, where he works with leaders and change agents to unlock the potential of business, government, educational, and philanthropic organizations. A leading voice and practitioner of human-centered design and networked innovation, he helps organizations in media, finance, retail, and health confront disruption stemming from shifts in consumer behavior, social trends, economic pressures, and new technology. Prior to IDEO, Dust was a project architect at Fernau & Hartman and spent eight years working with independent artists and major art organizations. He serves on boards for IDEO.org, the New School, NPR, and the Sundance Institute.