Employment and Jobs

Tools: Scheduling

May 11, 2020  • Economic Opportunities Program

Job Quality Tools Library > Section 4: Strengthening Practices to Improve Job Quality > Tools: Scheduling

Originally posted: May 11, 2020
Last updated: May 11, 2020

Section 4, the core of the library, includes tools designed to address specific components of job quality. Once organizations have determined their job quality priorities, they can turn to these tools to shift practices in the areas they have deemed most urgent, either in their own organizations or in the businesses with which they partner.

We’ve organized tools in eight categories that reflect the job quality attributes most commonly cited across the job quality frameworks and definitions included in Section 1. These attributes include wages, benefits, scheduling, legal rights, equity and inclusion, opportunity to build skills and advance, supportive work environment, and worker voice. Each attribute also includes sub-categories for ease of navigation.

↓ Tools and Resources Below the Box ↓

 

Tools

Pacific Community Ventures – Scheduling + Paid Leave

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This chapter in Good Jobs, Good Business – a toolkit for small business owners seeking to improve job quality – focuses on the importance of stable and flexible scheduling in retaining a high quality workforce. It makes the business case for stable scheduling and provides practical instructions on crafting and implementing a scheduling policy. This resource is designed for small business owners but has also been used by partners (including lenders and workforce development organizations) to coach businesses on job quality improvements with potential business benefits.


 

Supplemental Resources
  1. Center for WorkLife Law – Stable Scheduling Study. This report details the findings of a stable scheduling study conducted at Gap stores by an interdisciplinary team of academics. During the pilot study, stores in San Francisco and Chicago implemented stable scheduling practices, including two-week advance notice, elimination of on-call scheduling, tech-enabled shift swapping, and targeted additional staffing. Findings included a 7% increase in median sales and 5% increase in labor productivity at treatment stores. This case study’s findings help to demonstrate the potential business benefits of stable scheduling.