Employment and Jobs

Index of Job Quality Tools

May 11, 2020  • Economic Opportunities Program

Job Quality Tools Library > Index

Originally posted: May 11, 2020
Last updated: August 20, 2020

The Job Quality Tools Library offers actionable tools, resources, and guidance for leaders to improve jobs in their communities. Below is a list of all tools featured in the library.

↓ Tools and Resources Below the Box ↓

 

All Tools (Alphabetical by Source)

The Aspen Institute Economic Opportunities Program – Business Value Assessment Toolkit

Who’s It For: Employers, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This handbook offers guidance and instructions for using a set of tools to measure the value that a workforce development organization delivers to its business clients, such as through improved productivity and skills. This business value assessment begins with planning for the assessment and then using the included Excel tool and questionnaires to complete the assessment. It also includes information about why these assessments are valuable, potential limitations, and who should be included in the process, along with case studies that describe how workforce service providers partnered with businesses to measure results.

 

The Aspen Institute Economic Opportunities Program – Cost of Turnover Tool

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: To make the business case for improving retention, employers can use this simple calculator to get a ballpark estimate of hard costs of turnover. Partners can complete this exercise with businesses to show the value of their services or talent management practices that reduce turnover. Unlike many other turnover calculators, this tool includes both direct costs, such as the cost of hiring or orientation, and indirect costs, such as lower employee morale or poorer customer service.

 

The Aspen Institute Economic Opportunities Program – Job Quality Fellows Statement of Purpose

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This statement emerged from the collaborative work of the 2017-2018 Aspen Job Quality Fellows, innovators from diverse sectors who are working to expand quality jobs. It includes a list of key job quality attributes and a stated commitment to advance job quality. The statement offers a useful example for practitioners across fields seeking to define the elements of a quality job and publicly commit to job quality efforts.

 

The Aspen Institute Workforce Strategies Initiative – Question Bank for Workforce Service Providers: A Tool for Working with Retailers

Who’s It For: Workforce Development

What’s It For: This question bank includes targeted questions that workforce development professionals can ask retail business representatives to have learning-focused conversations and deepen relationships. The tool includes questions to help understand a business and its workforce, employee engagement, development and advancement in a firm, and wages and scheduling practices.

 

Associated Black Charities – 10 Essential Questions to Apply a Racial Equity Lens in Workforce Policy

Who’s It For: Workforce Development

What’s It For: Opportunities and advantages are not equally distributed, and new policies and practices could perpetuate racial inequities. These ten questions help workforce providers consider racial equity when developing or implementing workforce policies. These questions ask you to consider the design, access, impact, and operations of any workforce program in order to work toward more equitable outcomes. The tool is listed second under Publications, Studies and Reports.

 

BLab – The B Impact Assessment

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This detailed assessment is a tool to help employers generate a report about their social and environment impact, including impact on workers, and to benchmark against peer companies. It includes measures of job quality, including compensation, benefits, safety, and worker ownership. Practitioners who work with businesses could direct them to this tool or even walk them through it.

 

B Lab and Rhino Foods – Income Advance Guide

Who’s It For: Employers

What’s It For: This guide is designed to help support employers to implement an income advance program for employees in partnership with a financial institution. These programs provide small, same-day emergency loans to help workers weather financial emergencies and reduce stress. The tool includes an online resource library and a virtual peer group for information and support. This tool can be used by employers and the practitioners who advise them.

 

Center for Law and Social Innovation and the Center for Innovation in Worker Organization – The Labor Standards Enforcement Series

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: Labor laws can support job quality for workers — but only insofar as they are enforced and that workers know about these laws and can assert their rights without fear of retaliation. This detailed series includes briefs and webinars that highlight promising practices for implementing and upholding labor standards, including uncovering and investigating violations and enacting enforcement. The briefs are on topics including compliance, investigations, and collections. These resources explain the role that public agencies, community-based organizations, businesses, and advocates can play in ensuring that basic labor standards are upheld.

 

Center for WorkLife Law – Bias Interrupters – Tools for Organizations

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This set of tools serves as a guide to interrupt bias in processes such as hiring and recruiting, performance evaluations, assignments, meetings, and compensation. These steps can assist an organization in operationalizing inclusive workplace practices and distills the literature on bias into actionable steps.

 

City of Madison – Racial Equity & Social Justice Initiative Tools

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This set of equity tools is designed to help organizations and individuals operationalize equity. Included is an equitable hiring tool, equitable workforce plans, and equity analysis tools. Tools focused on policy and budgeting provide a framework for users to consider whose voices are at the table when designing policies and regulations, who is likely to be impacted, and if the policy outcomes would lead to a more or less equitable environment. While designed for local government, these tools have broad relevance for a wide audience, including employers, policymakers, workforce development professionals, and others interested in centering equity in their policy and programmatic work.

 

Coworker.org

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy

What’s It For: This online platform provides a tool for workers and their advocates to develop petitions and create campaigns to request tangible improvements in their workplaces, from wage increases to dress code modifications. Campaigns can attract media attention, and many past campaigns have resulted in employers announcing policy changes to improve job quality. This tool can be particularly valuable for workers that lack channels to provide feedback within their workplaces as well as worker advocates.

 

Democracy at Work Institute and the Ohio Employee Ownership Center – Selling Your Business to Your Employees – Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOP) & Worker-Owned Cooperatives

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: If a business owner is retiring or leaving the organization, transitioning to employee ownership is one avenue to sustain the business and workers’ jobs while strengthening job quality. This highly technical guide provides information for owners interested in selling their business to employees through an ESOP or co-op. Included are details about conducting a landscape analysis, legal rights, tax policy, and valuation of your business.

 

Economic Policy Institute – Family Budget Calculator

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This simple, user-friendly calculator serves as a tool to measure the income needed by a family to maintain an adequate standard of living in a specific community. It can calculate costs based on all counties and metro areas in the US and for 10 family types (one or two adults with zero to four children). Family budgets are calculated using seven components: housing, food, transportation, childcare, healthcare, taxes, and “other necessities.”

 

FSG Talent Rewire Initiative and Grads of Life – Opportunity Navigator

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This assessment is a tool to help employers (primarily >150 employees) benchmark their talent management strategies against those other employers are undertaking and to determine where to focus practice change efforts. The topics covered in the survey include recruiting, hiring, retention, advancement, and more. A separate resource section also provides a variety of business-facing tools. Practitioners who work with businesses could direct them to this tool and even walk them through it.

 

Good Companies, Good Jobs and Working Metrics – Tool

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This assessment tool analyzes the job quality of frontline workers through measures including retention, increase in average earnings, benefits access and quality, and diversity and inclusion. Using automated scoring and reporting, it benchmarks companies to industry peers and identifies and tracks potential human capital improvements. Unlike other assessment tools featured here, the benchmarks rely on publicly reported data rather than self-reporting by companies. This tool has value for a range of employers, including anchor institutions that can use it in their procurement processes.

 

Good Jobs Institute – Good Jobs Scorecard

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Workforce Development

What’s It For: The Good Jobs Institute created this scorecard to assess how well a business is delivering value to customers, employees, and investors. The employee scorecard measures performance across 9 “essential elements” of a quality job (see the framework included in Section 1). Employers and their partners can use this scorecard to build the case for practice change and set targets and track progress towards goals.

 

Good Jobs Institute – What is a “Good” Job?

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: MIT’s Good Jobs Institute created this framework to help employers seeking to improve worker experience, retention, and productivity to assess their performance across nine “essential elements” of a quality job. These include meeting an employee’s basic needs, such as through fair wages and a flexible schedule, and meeting “higher needs” such as personal growth, belonging, and recognition. While designed for employers, the framework has relevance for all practitioners seeking to define and assess job quality in an organization.

 

Google re:Work – Manager Training Tools

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: Workers report that their managers are a key contributor to job quality. This toolbox includes resources to train and support managers, including a manager feedback survey, new manager training materials, and templates for meetings with employees. While this tool is designed for businesses, other practitioners could share it with their business partners to encourage more supportive supervisory practices.

 

HCAP Partners – Gainful Jobs Approach

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: HCAP Partners – a fund providing debt and equity growth capital to lower-middle market companies – has developed this operational impact approach to assess job quality standards and improvements in portfolio companies through a quantitative measurement system. HCAP has identified five key attributes of job quality that fall within the categories of economic opportunity and health and wellness. HCAP engages with businesses to collect data, develop a baseline assessment, and build a strategic roadmap to implement and improve workplace initiatives for creating and maintaining high quality jobs. While this bespoke measurement system is designed to meet HCAP’s needs, other investors, lenders, and practitioners who work with businesses to improve job quality may find HCAP’s job quality definition and measurement framework useful in developing their own tools.

 

Institute for Employment Studies – Progression in Employment – An Employer Toolkit

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This employer toolkit is designed to engage employers in building pathways and opportunities to support career progression for workers, including by creating a supportive work environment through job redesign and supportive management. The toolkit includes information that can help employers make a business case, as well as embedded tools and case studies highlighting employer efforts. This toolkit is well suited for businesses, in particular HR professionals or other stakeholders involved in building internal career ladders. It also has applications for practitioners supporting employer practice change.

 

Institute for Women’s Policy Research – The Economic Security Database

Who’s It For: Employers, Workforce Development

What’s It For: These two indexes measure the true cost of living across different family sizes and in different localities in the United States. The BEST Index is a budget standard that can be adjusted for the needs of more than 400 family types, and the Elder Index measures the income that older adults need to age in place with dignity.

 

Job Accommodation Network – Accommodation and Compliance Series by Disability

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: The Job Accommodation Network’s publications include a resource series on Accommodation and Compliance, designed to support employers and employees in determining effective accommodations that comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Each publication in the series addresses a specific medical condition and potential accommodations and points toward resources for additional information. These publications can be used by practitioners assisting employers in accommodating disabilities as well as by individual employees as they discuss accommodations with their employer.

 

Job Accommodation Network – Employee Accommodation Inquiry Letter

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This post and sample letter details how to document your disability and how to share the information with your employer to provide an accommodation. It includes helpful information about an employee’s rights and a sample letter of inquiry to an employer. Employees and the advocates who support them may find this tool useful when interfacing with an employer about needed accommodations.

 

Job Accommodation Network – Employees’ Practical Guide to Requesting and Negotiating Reasonable Accommodation Under the Americans with Disabilities Act

Who’s It For: Employers, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This guide includes information about the legal basics of the Americans with Disabilities Act and how to request and negotiate an accommodation. Each section responds to commonly asked questions about the policies and practicalities of getting an accommodation at work, including if you have to disclose your disability to your employer and what accommodations you can request. This tool could be helpful for an individual employee, a practitioner informing clients of their rights, or an employer seeking to strengthen accommodations.

 

The Management Center – Equity & Inclusion Tools

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: The Management Center created this library of tools related to equity and inclusion aimed at addressing internal practices and management approaches of organizations. Included are worksheets, resources, and case studies that are have application for organizations seeking to further equitable opportunities and outcomes.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Living Wage Calculator

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This calculator is a tool for estimating the living wage by U.S. metro area, county, state, region, or at the national level. The living wage is defined as the wage needed to cover basic family expenses including housing, food, childcare, transportation, health, and other necessities, plus relevant taxes. The calculator estimates the living wage needed to support families of 12 different compositions (one to two adults with up to three children). Practitioners across fields can use this tool to benchmark compensation in local communities or firms against a wage rate that allows residents to meet minimum standards of living. Because the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a nonpartisan research institution, practitioners report that this tool has credibility with a range of audiences including businesses.

 

National Domestic Workers Alliance – Domestic Worker Organizing Toolbox

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy

What’s It For: In-home workers such as child and elder-care providers play an important role in the US economy, but they are excluded from many labor protections and vulnerable to exploitation. This toolbox is intended to assist domestic workers and the worker advocacy organizations that support them in organizing, strengthening their leadership skills, and implementing strategic campaigns to drive policy and practice change that improves job quality.

National Fund for Workforce Solutions – Guide to Employee Financial Wellness

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development

What’s It For: This seven-step guide can help employers assess their employees’ financial stability and make an actionable plan to strengthen financial wellness. The foundational step includes assessing employee wages and benefits to ensure workers are earning a livable wage. The following steps guide employers through various financial wellness solutions, including how to implement and evaluate strategies and solicit feedback. This guide is written for employers, it but could also be used by workforce development professionals or worker advocates who work closely with employers.

 

National Fund for Workforce Solutions – Job Design Framework

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This framework can help employers and their partners define job quality and design high-quality job opportunities in collaboration with workers, based on a menu of components of a quality job. The tool is built around three pillars that can help to attract and retain talent: foundational elements of a quality job such as wages and benefits, support elements such as training, and opportunity elements such as recognition.

 

National Partnership for Women and Families – Paid Family and Medical Leave

Who’s It For: Employers, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This policy brief is designed to inform the development of paid family and medical leave policies that can reduce inequalities for workers. It provides guidance on specific elements of paid leave policies such as ideal duration, eligibility requirements, and outreach strategies. While the primary audience for this tool is policymakers, it could also be useful for businesses who are crafting or re-shaping their paid leave policies or for providers advising businesses and policymakers.

 

Organizing Institute, AFL-CIO – Form a Union

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy

What’s It For: This is a step-by-step guide to workplace organizing. It is designed to help frontline workers and their advocates form a union, one longstanding approach to improving job quality that offers a channel to voice feedback to employers.

 

Pacific Community Ventures – Employee Engagement

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This chapter in Good Jobs, Good Business – a toolkit for small business owners seeking to improve job quality – promotes strategies to strengthen employee engagement and create a strong workplace culture. Tactics include creating a culture of respect and trust, emphasizing company values, and allowing employees to participate in decision-making. This resource is designed for small business owners but can also been used by partners (including lenders and workforce development organizations) to coach businesses on job quality improvements with potential business benefits.

Pacific Community Ventures – Health Benefits

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This chapter in Good Jobs, Good Business – a toolkit for small business owners seeking to improve job quality – includes an overview of the legal requirements of health benefits, the business case for providing them, and options for structuring these benefits. Designed for small business owners, this resource has also been used by partners (including lenders and workforce development organizations) to coach businesses on job quality improvements. It has applications for a range of organizations interested in adding or expanding health benefits, including nonprofits.

Pacific Community Ventures – Moving Beyond Job Creation – Defining and Measuring the Creation of Quality Jobs

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This discussion paper is designed to help Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) define and measure job quality. It defines a quality job as one that contains most (if not all) of five elements: a living wage, basic benefits, career-building opportunities, wealth-building opportunities, and a fair and engaging workplace. The paper offers impact measurement practices to assess and report on job quality to help CDFIs encourage and support their business borrowers to enhance the quality of jobs they offer. While this resource is written for lenders, it has applications for all practitioners seeking to define and measure job quality within a firm.

 

Pacific Community Ventures – Retirement + Wealth Building

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This chapter in Good Jobs, Good Business – a toolkit for small business owners seeking to improve job quality – provides guidance on supporting employees to save for retirement. It makes the case that having an employer-sponsored retirement plan can increase employee job satisfaction and retention and provide tax benefits for the business and its employees. This resource is designed for small business owners but has also been used by partners (including lenders and workforce development organizations) to coach businesses on job quality improvements with potential business benefits.

 

Pacific Community Ventures – Scheduling + Paid Leave

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This chapter in Good Jobs, Good Business – a toolkit for small business owners seeking to improve job quality – focuses on the importance of stable and flexible scheduling in retaining a high quality workforce. It makes the business case for stable scheduling and provides practical instructions on crafting and implementing a scheduling policy. This resource is designed for small business owners but has also been used by partners (including lenders and workforce development organizations) to coach businesses on job quality improvements with potential business benefits.

 

The Paid Leave Project – Paid Family & Medical Leave Playbook

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This playbook can help businesses and the partners who advise them to design and implement paid family leave policies. The step-by-step guide is helpful in crafting a plan that includes leave duration, portion of pay covered, and other guidelines. It also explores the benefits of implementing paid family leave, such as improved retention and employee engagement. In addition to employers, nonprofit organizations seeking to strengthen their internal paid leave policies could also make use of this resource.

 

Partnership for Working Families – Community Benefits Agreements: A Framework for Success

Who’s It For: Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This framework is a guide to creating an agreement between community organizations and real estate developers to help meet local needs and hold developers accountable over time. Community Benefits Agreements can include job quality specifications, such as stipulated wages and expectations of hiring community residents. These agreements can also include job quality benchmarks in the selection of tenants for a new development. As legally binding commitments, CBAs can be a useful tool in setting and enforcing long-term expectations for job quality.

 

PHI – Nine Elements of a Quality Caregiving Job

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This issue brief by PHI analyzes the impacts of recent policy changes in New York state impacting home care aides and defines what a quality job looks like for a caregiver. The elements of a quality job in this occupation are organized in three categories: compensation, opportunity, and supports. While designed for care workers, the framework has relevance across industries and application for all practitioners seeking to define and assess job quality in an organization.

 

PHI – PHI Coaching Approach

Who’s It For: Employers, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This training curriculum supports direct care supervisors to strengthen communication, critical thinking, teamwork, and problem-solving skills. Curriculum content includes improving active listening, learning how to ask questions, and giving and receiving feedback. While designed for direct care organizations, this curriculum has applications for practitioners across fields seeking to encourage supportive supervisory practices that are critical to job quality.

Prosperity Now and the Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis – Workplace Financial Wellness Services: A Primer for Employers

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This toolkit includes a primer to workplace financial wellness services, questions to consider when exploring these services, and employer experiences with provision of these services. These supports can contribute to job quality when paired with adequate compensation by helping employees manage finances and build assets. This resource includes descriptions of common services, such as financial counseling and coaching, debt management, savings products, and online financial management tools. This tool is most useful for businesses interested in adding or expanding financial wellness benefits. Partners could also share this tool with businesses or could use it to strengthen their own organizations’ financial wellness supports.

 

Race Forward and Center for Social Inclusion – Ready for Equity in Workforce Development: Racial Equity Readiness Assessment Tool

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This racial equity tool is designed to support workforce development organizations and practitioners to advance their racial equity practice. The assessment guides workforce development organizations and practitioners to evaluate their programs, operations, and culture in order to identify areas of strength and opportunities for growth. Practitioners can use the toolkit to explore approaches that support institutional racial equity, evaluate their current efforts, and plan next steps to strengthen their practices.

 

Race Matters: Racial Equity Impact Analysis

Who’s It For: Employers, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This impact analysis tool by Race Matters can be used to assess the impact of policies, programs, and practices on racial equity. The tool provides a set of five guiding questions to determine if existing and proposed policies and programs are likely to address specific racial disparities in the United States.

 

Race Matters – Organizational Self-Assessment

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This organizational self-assessment can be used to measure staff competencies and awareness of racial inequities in your organization. The assessment includes questions related to competencies as well as organizational operations. The resulting racial equity score corresponds to potential next steps and tools that can help support your organization wherever you may be on your racial equity journey.

 

Race Matters: What’s Race Got To Do With It?

Who’s It For: Employers, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This tool supports leaders to use data to assess the extent to which observed disparities are due to policies, practices, and processes that have a racial dimension. This six-step tool can be used by decision-makers in any organization to analyze outcomes and disparities.

 

Reimagine Retail Chicagoland – Reimagining Employer Engagement: A Toolkit for Providers

Who’s It For: Workforce Development

What’s It For: Workforce development practitioners can use this how-to guide to build capacity to strengthen relationships with employers. Turn to page 8 for instructions on finding and using local labor market information to help jobseekers make educated job decisions and to inform employer engagement, and relevant programming. While the guide is designed for workforce professionals in the Chicago area, many of the listed resources are national or have equivalents in other regions.

 

Reimagine Retail Chicagoland – Reimagining Employer Engagement: A Toolkit for Providers

Who’s It For: Workforce Development

What’s It For: Workforce development practitioners can use this how-to guide to build capacity to strengthen relationships with employers. It includes instructions on researching employers and labor markets, preparing for meetings with employers, talking about job quality, pitching services, and deepening employer relationships.

 

ROC United, Race Forward, and the Center for Social Inclusion – Adding Racial Equity to the Menu

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This toolkit provides leaders in the restaurant industry with practical resources for assessing, planning, and implementing steps to embed racial equity in workplace practices. Through partnerships with two restaurants, the toolkit highlights skills and tools critical to supporting restaurants on their racial equity journey and provides tangible examples to support implementation. This toolkit can help employers and their partners identify where racial bias may be operating in a restaurant’s policies and practices and implement solutions.

 

UpSkill America and the Institute for Corporate Productivity – From Tuition Reimbursement to Tuition Disbursement: Key Components and Considerations

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This step-by-step guide by Upskill America, an initiative of the Economic Opportunities Program, and the Institute for Corporate Productivity details the steps to change an organization’s tuition assistance program to a tuition disbursement program, providing financial support for education up-front rather than offering reimbursement after a worker has completed a program. This simple change to the structure of a tuition assistance program has important job quality and equity implications; it can make education and upskilling accessible to workers who are eager to learn but lack access to resources to pay for school. This tool is useful for employers and all practitioners who work with them to strengthen job quality.

 

Urban Institute – Net Income Change Calculator

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This calculator can help a provider or individual assess how a family’s change in income could affect public benefits from safety net programs (also known as the “benefits cliff”). This tool allows users to test scenarios at different earning levels and show results for all U.S. states. Businesses and their partners might use this tool as they consider the appropriate wage and benefits mix to enhance job quality and ensure economic stability for all workers.

 

US Department of Labor – A Quick-Start Toolkit – Building Registered Apprenticeship Programs

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This toolkit by the Department of Labor provides steps and resources to start and register an apprenticeship program. When delivered appropriately and connected to advancement opportunities, apprenticeships can strengthen job quality by increasing worker stability and mobility. This toolkit could be particularly useful for a business or labor organization, a workforce intermediary, a community-based organization, or an education institution developing an apprenticeship program.

Women Employed – Filing an Employment Discrimination Charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

Who’s It For: Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: While workers are granted basic protections against discrimination under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, these rights are not always enforced. This fact sheet provides a step-by-step walkthrough of the EEOC filing process to take legal recourse against discrimination. Included are sections such as a description of your legal rights, information needed to file a charge, the investigation, the employer’s response, and mediation and settlement. This resource will be most useful for workers facing discrimination and their advocates.

 

Women’s Fund of the Greater Cincinnati Foundation – Employer Toolkit

Who’s It For: Employers, Economic Development, Investing and Lending, Policy, Worker Advocacy, Workforce Development

What’s It For: This toolkit is a collection of nearly 60 workplace policies that can help support, stabilize, and retain employees in low-wage work. The toolkit also contains a section on second-chance employment for formerly incarcerated individuals. After a quick, free registration, the Employer Toolkit search feature can help you identify specific policy recommendations, many of which include sample HR policy language that companies can draw from. One section provides guidance for developing supportive paid leave policies, which may be useful for both employers and the practitioners who work with them.